10 Do not underestimate API automation testing

softwarebuck April 25, 2021 0 Comments



API Testing Guide and Beginner’s Tips (SOAP & REST)


API (application programming interface) testing is a type of software testingthat performs verification directly at the API level. It is a part ofintegration testing that determines whether the APIs meet the testers’expectations of functionality, reliability, performance, and security. UnlikeUI testing, API testing is performed at the message layer without GUI.Learn more: Introduction to API TestingThere are two broad classes of web service for Web API: SOAP and REST. SOAP(Simple Object Access Protocol) is a standard protocol defined by the W3Cstandards for sending and receiving web service requests and responses. REST(REpresentational State Transfer) is the web standards-based architecture thatuses HTTP. Unlike SOAP-based Web services, there is no official standard forRESTful Web APIs.Here are 10 basic tips that you need to know for API testing:

2. Specify the API output status


The most common API output you need to verify in API testing is the responsestatus code.Verifying if the response code equals to 200 or not to decide whether an APItesting is passed or failed is familiar to new API testers. This is not awrong verification. However, it does not reflect all test scenarios of theAPI.All API response status codes are separated into five classes (or categories)in a global standard. The first digit of the status code defines the class ofresponse. The last two digits do not have any class or categorization role.There are five values for the first digit: * 1xx (Informational): The request is received and continues to be processed * 2xx (Successful): The request is successfully received, understood, and accepted * 3xx (Redirection): Further action needs to be taken to complete the request * 4xx (Client Error): The request contains the wrong syntax or cannot be fulfilled * 5xx (Server Error): The server fails to fulfill an apparently valid requestHowever, the actual response status code of an API is specified by thedevelopment team that built the API. So as a tester, you need to verifywhether: * The code follows global standard classes * The code is specified in the requirement.

5. Leverage automation capability for API testing


Leverage automation capability for your API testing as much and as early aspossible. Here are some significant benefits of automating API tests: * Test data and execution history can be saved along with API endpoints. This makes it easier to rerun tests later. * API tests are stable and changed with care. An API reflects a business rule of the system. Any change in the API needs an explicit requirement; so testers can always stay alert of any changes and adjust them on time. * Test execution is much faster compared to Web UI test * API testing is considered as black-box testing in which the users send input and get output for verification. Automation with a data-driven approach — i.e. applying different datasets in the same test scenario — can help increase API test coverage * Data input and output follows some specific templates or models so that you can create test scripts only once. These test scripts can also be reused throughout the entire testing project. * API tests can be performed at the early stage of the software development lifecycle. An automation approach with mocking techniques can help verify API and its integration before the actual API is developed. Hence, the level of dependency within the team is reduced.

10. Do not underestimate API automation testing


API testing flow is quite simple with three main steps: * Send the request with necessary input data * Get the response having output data * Verify that the response returned as expected in the requirementThe most touch parts of API testing are not either sending request norreceiving the response. They are test data management and verification. It iscommon that testing a few first APIs such as login, query some resources, etc.is quite simple. The testing task becomes more and more difficult to furtherAPIs. Therefore, API testing task is easy to be underestimated. At some pointin time, you would find yourself in the middle of choosing a good approach fortest data and verification method. It is because the returned data havesimilar structures, but not the same in a testing project. It will bedifficult to decide if you should verify the JSON/XML data key by key, orusing object mapping to leverage the power of programming language.Considering API automation testing a real development project is highlysuggested. It should be structured to be extendable, reusable, andmaintainable.Author: Trong Bui — QA Architect at KMS Technology Original source: https://www.katalon.com/resources-center/blog/api-testing-tips/10 API Testing Tips for Beginners (SOAP & REST)API (application programming interface) testing is a type of software testingthat performs verification directly at the API level. It is a part ofintegration testing that determines whether the APIs meet the testers’expectations of functionality, reliability, performance, and security. UnlikeUI testing, API testing is performed at the message layer without GUI.Learn more: Introduction to API TestingThere are two broad classes of web service for Web API: SOAP and REST. SOAP(Simple Object Access Protocol) is a standard protocol defined by the W3Cstandards for sending and receiving web service requests and responses. REST(REpresentational State Transfer) is the web standards-based architecture thatuses HTTP. Unlike SOAP-based Web services, there is no official standard forRESTful Web APIs.Here are 10 basic tips that you need to know for API testing:

2. Specify the API output status


The most common API output you need to verify in API testing is the responsestatus code.Verifying if the response code equals to 200 or not to decide whether an APItesting is passed or failed is familiar to new API testers. This is not awrong verification. However, it does not reflect all test scenarios of theAPI.All API response status codes are separated into five classes (or categories)in a global standard. The first digit of the status code defines the class ofresponse. The last two digits do not have any class or categorization role.There are five values for the first digit: * 1xx (Informational): The request is received and continues to be processed * 2xx (Successful): The request is successfully received, understood, and accepted * 3xx (Redirection): Further action needs to be taken to complete the request * 4xx (Client Error): The request contains the wrong syntax or cannot be fulfilled * 5xx (Server Error): The server fails to fulfill an apparently valid requestHowever, the actual response status code of an API is specified by thedevelopment team that built the API. So as a tester, you need to verifywhether: * The code follows global standard classes * The code is specified in the requirement.

5. Leverage automation capability for API testing


Leverage automation capability for your API testing as much and as early aspossible. Here are some significant benefits of automating API tests: * Test data and execution history can be saved along with API endpoints. This makes it easier to rerun tests later. * API tests are stable and changed with care. An API reflects a business rule of the system. Any change in the API needs an explicit requirement; so testers can always stay alert of any changes and adjust them on time. * Test execution is much faster compared to Web UI test * API testing is considered as black-box testing in which the users send input and get output for verification. Automation with a data-driven approach — i.e. applying different datasets in the same test scenario — can help increase API test coverage * Data input and output follows some specific templates or models so that you can create test scripts only once. These test scripts can also be reused throughout the entire testing project. * API tests can be performed at the early stage of the software development lifecycle. An automation approach with mocking techniques can help verify API and its integration before the actual API is developed. Hence, the level of dependency within the team is reduced.

10. Do not underestimate API automation testing


API testing flow is quite simple with three main steps: * Send the request with necessary input data * Get the response having output data * Verify that the response returned as expected in the requirementThe most touch parts of API testing are not either sending request norreceiving the response. They are test data management and verification. It iscommon that testing a few first APIs such as login, query some resources, etc.is quite simple. The testing task becomes more and more difficult to furtherAPIs. Therefore, API testing task is easy to be underestimated. At some pointin time, you would find yourself in the middle of choosing a good approach fortest data and verification method. It is because the returned data havesimilar structures, but not the same in a testing project. It will bedifficult to decide if you should verify the JSON/XML data key by key, orusing object mapping to leverage the power of programming language.Considering API automation testing a real development project is highlysuggested. It should be structured to be extendable, reusable, andmaintainable.Author: Trong Bui – QA Architect at KMS Technology10 Simple API Testing Tips for Beginners (SOAP & REST)API (application programming interface) testing is a type of software testingthat performs verification directly at the API level. It is a part ofintegration testing that determines whether the APIs meet the testers’expectations of functionality, reliability, performance, and security. UnlikeUI testing, API testing is performed at the message layer without GUI.There are two broad classes of web service for Web API: SOAP and REST. SOAP(Simple Object Access Protocol) is a standard protocol defined by the W3Cstandards for sending and receiving web service requests and responses. REST(Representational State Transfer) is the web standards-based architecture thatuses HTTP. Unlike SOAP-based Web services, there is no official standard forRESTful Web APIs.Here are 10 basic tips that you need to know for API testing:

2. Specify the API output status


The most common API output you need to verify in API testing is the responsestatus code.Verifying if the response code equals to 200 or not to decide whether an APItesting is passed or failed is familiar to new API testers. This is not awrong verification. However, it does not reflect all test scenarios of theAPI.All API response status codes are separated into five classes (or categories)in a global standard. The first digit of the status-code defines the class ofresponse. The last two digits do not have any class or categorization role.There are five values for the first digit: * 1xx (Informational): The request is received and continues to be processed * 2xx (Successful): The request is successfully received, understood, and accepted * 3xx (Redirection): Further action needs to be taken to complete the request * 4xx (Client Error): The request contains the wrong syntax or cannot be fulfilled * 5xx (Server Error): The server fails to fulfill an apparently valid requestHowever, the actual response status code of an API is specified by thedevelopment team that built the API. So as a tester, you need to verifywhether: * The code follows global standard classes * The code is specified in the requirement.

5. Leverage automation capability for API testing


Leverage automation capability for your API testing as much and as early aspossible. Here are some significant benefits of automating API tests: * Test data and execution history can be saved along with API endpoints. This makes it easier to rerun tests later. * API tests are stable and changed with care. An API reflects a business rule of the system. Any change in the API needs an explicit requirement; so testers can always stay alert of any changes and adjust them on time. * Test execution is much faster compared to Web UI test * API testing is considered as black-box testing in which the users send input and get output for verification. Automation with a data-driven approach — i.e. applying different datasets in the same test scenario — can help increase API test coverage * Data input and output follows some specific templates or models so that you can create test scripts only once. These test scripts can also be reused throughout the entire testing project. * API tests can be performed at the early stage of the software development lifecycle. An automation approach with mocking techniques can help verify API and its integration before the actual API is developed. Hence, the level of dependency within the team is reduced.

10. Do not underestimate API automation testing


API testing flow is quite simple with three main steps: * Send the request with necessary input data * Get the response having output data * Verify that the response returned as expected in the requirementThe most touch parts of API testing are not either sending request norreceiving the response. They are test data management and verification. It iscommon that testing a few first APIs such as login, query some resources, etc.is quite simple. The testing task becomes more and more difficult to furtherAPIs. Therefore, API testing task is easy to be underestimated. At some pointin time, you would find yourself in the middle of choosing a good approach fortest data and verification method. It is because the returned data havesimilar structures, but not the same in a testing project. It will bedifficult to decide if you should verify the JSON/XML data key by key, orusing object mapping to leverage the power of programming language.Considering API automation testing a real development project is highlysuggested. It should be structured to be extendable, reusable, andmaintainable.11 top open-source API testing tools: What your team needs to knowHow do you find the right open-source API testing tool for your needs? Sincemy last roundup of the best candidates, a few more tools have appeared thatwarrant consideration—and there’s a new technique that’s all the buzz in AIautomation circles that you need to know about.While most vendors are talking up the benefits of AI- and UI-based testingtools in general, AI- and machine learning-based applications that help withAPI testing have arrived.Before you begin API testing, however, make sure you understand testautomation basics and know how to avoid the most common test automationmistakes.

Why perform API testing?


As more companies make the shift left toward DevOps, continuous integration(CI), and continuous deployment (CD), test feedback needs to be quicker thanever. Focusing solely on UI automation—which is notoriously slow—can kill yourtest automation efforts.As you scramble to ensure that your applications are ready to ship, APItesting should be part of your overall automation strategy.APIs are the basis of modern software development, especially as more and moreteams move away from monolithic applications and begin adopting amicroservices approach to software development.With microservices making up the backbone of most newer development efforts,API testing becomes even more critical than before.

Automating API testing with the right tool


API automation can help accelerate testing and increase efficiency. In allsorts of software testing, it is required to automate the test cases which arerepeatedly executed, like regression cases. Similarly, in the case of APItesting, there might be some cases in which you need to execute before everyrelease and those cases can be automated. The test data and execution historycan also be saved with API endpoints, which makes it easier to rerun tests. An important step toward leveraging the automation capability of API testingis choosing the most suitable tool or a set of suitable tools in the market.There are many tools that are popular in the market, including:RapidAPI Testing is one such tool that was recently introduced.Browse more Top API Testing Tools.Try RapidAPI Testing

How to automate API testing with RapidAPI Testing


RapidAPI Testing is a new RapidAPI product made specifically to streamline thetesting of an API.You do not need an additional account to use this product, it is alreadyconnected to your RapidAPI account so you can use the same credentials.To start using this service, you need to log into your RapidAPI account and goto https://rapidapi.com/testing/. You’ll see the list of APIs you work withinyour account. You can add tests to any of them or create a new API.Below are some simple examples of using RapidAPI Testing. For more informationon the service check out the official documentation.Try RapidAPI Testing

Grouping tests together


In a typical testing project, there are usually a large number of APIendpoints that perform different tasks. This number may range from the low 20sto 100s depending on the project. It is highly recommended that youorganize/group these APIs into categories. This helps to create test scenariosmore effectively with high coverage. Below is an example of the grouping ofSendGrid’s API done by RapidAPI.In the above image, we can see that the APIs have been divided into categoriessuch as: Mail, Blocks, Bounces, etc. And each of these categories havemultiple endpoints as can be seen in the Spam Reports category. Thesegroupings are found in the left column of the endpoints tab for a chosenservice on RapidAPI. Try RapidAPI Testing

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *